The FlushBrush is a more hygienic, self-cleaning toilet brush

The FlushBrush is here to revolutionize toilet cleaning. Most toilet bowl cleaners are kept in holders next to the toilet, which means they’re rarely sanitized and are easily accessible to pets and children. The FlushBrush, however, comes with an improved storage cradle, while its silicone head makes it more hygienic than the typical plastic-bristle brush.

“I believe that the toilet brush is one of the most dangerous, dirty and outdated items in the home,” creator Tom Keen explained. “So I invented an alternative. Together with a small design and engineering team in the south of the U.K., FlushBrush has been meticulously designed and tested over the last two years.”

The FlushBrush’s hydrophobic silicone cleaning head is designed without any “dirt traps” and can repel both dirt and water, according to the product’s 2020 IndieGoGo campaign. The key to keeping the FlushBrush as germ-free as possible isn’t just in its materials, it’s also where it is stored. The silicone head is detachable and is kept in a discreet compartment underneath the toilet’s flow of water. 

With every flush, bacteria and buildup are washed off of the cleaning head. For those concerned it will fall into the bowl, the head floats and can easily be retrieved thanks to magnets inside the head and handle. 

But the FlushBrush isn’t just more hygienic than a typical toilet brush — it’s more eco-friendly, too. 

With bristled toilet cleaners, most people will repeatedly flush the toilet to clean the tool. Each toilet flush uses 1.6 gallons of water on average. The FlushBrush is cleaned with regular toilet use so there’s no need to spare the extra water. Moreover, no harsh chemicals are needed to disinfect the brush. Plastic use is also reduced as the head only needs to be replaced rather than the whole device. 

More environmentally friendly, more hygienic and more compact, the FlushBrush makes a compelling case for consumers, who have already pledged $528,000 on IndieGoGo. It may not be on the market yet, but you can follow the innovative toilet brush’s journey from prototype to production here

If you enjoyed this story, you might also like reading about where to find toilet paper if you are in need.

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