Even the Supreme Court has to remind people to mute themselves

Lady Justice might be blind, but she can definitely still hear.

A feature with virtual meetings and conference calls that people seem to be struggling with is remembering to go mute when they aren’t speaking.

This is even the case for the highest court in the country.

For the first time in history, the Supreme Court is holding publicly broadcasted oral arguments by teleconference so cases can continue to be heard during the pandemic, reports Business Insider.

Attorney Roman Martinez was arguing on behalf of the American Association of Political Consultants (AAPC) in its case against Attorney General William Barr and the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

In another historical first for the case, a toilet could be heard flushing in the background as Martinez spoke. It was later clarified that it was not coming from Martinez’s end, but from someone else on the teleconference who had not muted their mic.

It is a sound that will go down in political history.

The AAPC is challenging part of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act of 1991 that reduces the number of unwanted robocalls or auto-dialed, pre-recorded calls. The AAPC claims to benefit from looser restrictions around pre-recorded cold-calling and is arguing that bans against robocalls violate the First Amendment.

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