Freerunner Dominic Di Tommaso pulls off stunts throughout crowds in Bruges

Those who live in dense urban cities often miss something happening right in front of them thanks to all of the chaos.

At least that’s freerunner Dominic Di Tommaso’s theory. For his short film “What Tourists Don’t See,” Di Tommaso does some of his craziest stunts while hiding in plain sight.

Freerunning has its lineage in parkour and Asian martial arts. Parkour began as a military technique — the aim is running, swinging and climbing in the fastest way possible to get from one point to another. Freerunning adds showmanship and performance to parkour, turning it into a sport rather than a method.

Di Tommaso shows how freerunning borrows parkour’s acrobatics and stylistic tricks in a video set in Bruges. He cartwheels, backflips, jumps and sprints through crowds. In one shot, he throws himself off the edge of a terrace and straight into a packed canal boat.

In another scene, he hops from roof to roof of buildings and structures. Di Tommaso even sits with his legs dangling off the ledge of the Belfry of Bruges, a medieval bell tower and watches the unsuspecting people down below.

“My view from atop the Belfry is something I’ll never forget,” Di Tommaso told Red Bull. “Dangling my feet over the edge at a height of 61 meters, overlooking the entire city. Unforgettable. Getting the chance to be there — I don’t even know if someone ever did this before me — is a moment I’ll cherish forever.”

Di Tommaso began freerunning in 2007 following stints in ballet, figure skating and a full-time job as a garbage man. In 2016, he joined Team Farang, an elite group of freerunners.

If you enjoyed this story, watch these athletes turn their best tricks into optical illusions.

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