Home baker shares terrifying results of first time making bread

Now that virtually everyone has taken up baking as a hobby amid quarantine, it’s only natural that some people are going to be better at it than others. And thankfully, those who are trying (and failing) to frost cupcakes and bake bread are sharing their futile attempts online so fellow failures can commiserate and feel better about their own shortcomings.

On April 30, home cook Nick Gavio took to Twitter to share his first-ever attempt at baking bread — if you can even call it that.

“Everyone has posted pics of the Very Nice bread they’ve cooked during quarantine so to keep you all honest, here’s the absolute monstrosity I whipped up today in an epic failure (first time ever making bread),” he wrote.

As you can see from the photos, Nick’s bread looks more like a mutant cookie than a loaf of sourdough.

“I think the problem was that I dissolved the yeast in water that was too hot and killed it,” he said in a follow-up tweet.

People couldn’t help but poke fun at Nick’s flat bread.

“Same energy,” one Twitter user joked, comparing the bread to a photo of an oddly flat crocodile.

“I’m not sure you ‘made bread,'” another person added.

“It looks like it inexplicably weighs ten pounds,” a third user said.

Some users, however, applauded Nick’s bravery and took the opportunity to share their own fails.

“I feel seen – this was my first attempt at bread last week,” one person said along with a photo of their own bad bread.

“That looks a lot like the Neolithic bread I made lol,” another person added, alongside photos of a bread that is somehow flatter than Nick’s.

Hopefully next time Nick will either dissolve the yeast in cold water or buy his bread at the grocery store.

If you enjoyed this article, learn why people are actually mad about the current spike in sourdough baking.

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