Teacher 3D-prints Iron Man-inspired prosthetic arm for student struggling in class

A school teacher in the U.K. used a 3D printer to make his student a bionic prosthetic arm.

Lewis McCaslin was born without a forearm. The 12-year-old had a prosthetic arm, but it wasn’t exactly comfortable. His design and technology teacher, Daniel Grant, noticed McCaslin didn’t like wearing the prosthetic and was struggling in lessons because of it. Grant knew he wanted to make a better prosthetic for the student.

“The last one was like heavy, tighter and you had to actually bend your arm and it hurt,” Lewis told the Associated Press.

Grant used a 3D printing method with the help of Team UnLimbited. He sent the organization Lewis’s measurements and it gave him the blueprint to make the custom limb. The teacher borrowed a 3D printer from the school, using materials that only cost £30 ($42 USD), he completed the project over the school holidays.

Soon enough, Lewis had a brand new arm that lit up just like Iron Man’s bionic arm.

“There are some modifications we need to make and I think we’re both learning its capabilities,” Grant told the Associated Press. “But it’s been superb to watch him pick up various bits and pieces and I just hope that he gets a lot of enjoyment out of it.”

So far Lewis doesn’t have very many complaints, it seemed. He can now climb and play more sports with his friends.

“I think he’s a great teacher, he helps people out and I can finally ride my bike to the park and all that,” Lewis said.

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